Packed with fiber, water, and antioxidants, fruits and vegetables are great choices for diet-friendly snacking. But the standard banana or carrots and ranch dip can get old quick. Instead, try a sliced apple with a lowfat cheese wedge, like Laughing Cow Light. "Having a little extra fat is good in a snack because it sustains you longer," says McLachlan.
I made those today with lime flavour. I wanted sour candy and didn’t have citric acid… but now it’s in a mold (same kind of mold you used) in the fridge. I tried to get it out of the mold, but it’s not possible. it breaks. So is there a better way to get it out or didn’t I use enough agar-agar? Or is it not long enough in the fridge yet… what did I do wrong?
I see you’ve mentioned many times that they need to be refrigerated, but I’m wondering what the short-term shelf stability of these is. For example, if I made them at night, stored them in the fridge, and then packed them for my kids’ lunch the next morning, would they make it until lunchtime? Or would they lose shape and melt? Is the need to refrigerate more of a general food consumption safety rule, or will they just turn to mush? Thanks!

Quesadillas without cheese may seem like a contradiction in terms, but they are indeed a thing in Mexico—and, more to the point, they can be delicious. Here, we mix mashed leftover sweet potato with cilantro, scallions, and pickled jalapeños (though you can sub whatever other quesadilla fillings strike your fancy); spread it over half of a flour tortilla; fold it; and cook it in plenty of oil, just as we recommend in our basic quesadilla guide.
Oh wow, I can’t decide which of these recipes looks the yummiest! I’ve already made quite a few of these, but I spotted a few that I hadn’t seen before and really need to try. Particularly the cranberry lemon coconut chia bars… holy crap those look tasty. Thanks for the round-up of awesome recipes to get your vegan on! Carnivores be damned, vegans have more fun :)

When hunger strikes, a hardboiled egg is a great grab-and-go snack. It’s high in protein, which will curb your appetite and keep you from reaching for something less-than-healthy. Plus it packs nutrients like vitamins D and B12, but only contains 77 calories. Simply prep a bunch of hard-boiled eggs at once, and store them in the fridge for a quick hunger fix.

If you're sacrificing snacks to cut calories, stop—to lose weight, you need snacks. "Snacking is an opportunity to fuel your body between meals," says nutritionist Rania Batayneh, author of The One One One Diet. Healthy snacks ensure you won't be ravenous come mealtime and keep your fat-burning metabolism revved up. Here are 21 nutritionist-approved choices for both store-bought and make-your-own snacks. Each nosh packs 150 to 200 calories, is filled with good-for-you nutrients, and will make you feel like your diet is about anything but deprivation.
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This gourmet treat is an awesome balanced and satisfying snack. The pumpernickel toast lends fiber to help keep your belly full until your next meal. While the salmon boasts high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, B vitamins, potassium, and selenium. Plus, these tasty toasts include a horseradish spread for just the right amount of flavor kick. The best part: They take less than 10 minutes to make!
This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.
For this saucy Korean-style cauliflower snack, you can toss the golden-brown nuggets in either a sweet soy-garlic sauce or a sweet-and-spicy chili sauce, depending on your taste. The cauliflower florets' thin, shatteringly crisp crust is thanks to the same cornstarch, flour, and vodka batter we use for our Korean fried chicken—it's perfect for soaking up either sauce. We add sesame seeds and coconut flakes to the batter to give it a nice nuttiness and extra crunch. Leave out those ingredients, and your fried cauliflower is great for serving Buffalo-style.
This is more of a dessert than a snack but I still eat it for a snack quite often, especially during the summer. To make it add frozen strawberries, a small piece of frozen banana and 1/2 a scoop of vanilla vegan protein powder to a high-powered blender. Add just enough plant-based milk to allow it to blend, just a few tablespoons is perfect, and blend until smooth.
It's as simple a snack recipe as can be, but unusually satisfying: For a twist on plain homemade popcorn, try drizzling it with olive oil and sprinkling it with za'atar, the heady Middle Eastern spice blend of oregano, thyme, sesame seeds, and tart sumac. You can check out all our popcorn flavors here, including Thai coconut curry, miso soup, and roast chicken dinner; those three are vegan if you swap out the butter.
What about evening snacking? The biggest problem with nighttime snacks is most of us reach for ice cream and chips-not fruit and yogurt. That's not to say you can't have a treat after dinner. Some of your favorite evening snacks may even be on this list (chocolate! popcorn!). One thing to note, if you're always hungry after dinner, make sure your meal is made up of filling and healthy foods and you're getting enough food. If all you're nibbling on is a lackluster salad you may legitimately be hungry and need an evening snack(see our best dinner foods for weight loss). If you love an evening snack after dinner, serve yourself a healthy portion onto a plate or bowl so you're not scooping straight from the container.
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