This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.


For a more substantial alternative to cookies, try these no-bake, oat-based bites, where almonds and almond butter pack in healthy fats to make them highly satisfying. Note that the dark chocolate drizzle on top adds a bit of time to the recipe, but as with most things chocolate, it’s totally worth it. Swap in maple syrup for the honey if you follow a strict vegan diet.
It's as simple a snack recipe as can be, but unusually satisfying: For a twist on plain homemade popcorn, try drizzling it with olive oil and sprinkling it with za'atar, the heady Middle Eastern spice blend of oregano, thyme, sesame seeds, and tart sumac. You can check out all our popcorn flavors here, including Thai coconut curry, miso soup, and roast chicken dinner; those three are vegan if you swap out the butter.

This classic Sicilian eggplant dish, terrific as a spread, a dip, or a pasta sauce, is proof positive that vegan food doesn't have to be bland. The sweet-and-sour mixture packs in all sorts of intense flavors, including pine nuts, mint, raisins, capers, and vinegar. Even with the long ingredient list, it's not that hard to make: By cooking the ingredients in a particular order, we've engineered this recipe to use just one skillet.


This is more of a dessert than a snack but I still eat it for a snack quite often, especially during the summer. To make it add frozen strawberries, a small piece of frozen banana and 1/2 a scoop of vanilla vegan protein powder to a high-powered blender. Add just enough plant-based milk to allow it to blend, just a few tablespoons is perfect, and blend until smooth.

I see you’ve mentioned many times that they need to be refrigerated, but I’m wondering what the short-term shelf stability of these is. For example, if I made them at night, stored them in the fridge, and then packed them for my kids’ lunch the next morning, would they make it until lunchtime? Or would they lose shape and melt? Is the need to refrigerate more of a general food consumption safety rule, or will they just turn to mush? Thanks!
Check out Snacks from Scratch—15 Chips and Crackers to Make at Home! Get your snack on but skip the store! The best part about cooking at home (other than how fun it can be) is getting to chose which ingredients you put into your food! We went through the Food Monster App looking for simple, homemade, crunchy snack recipes for you to try out! These are easy enough to make with the kids but delicious enough to share with anyone in your life!
Toasted bread is a blank canvas for creativity. At dinner, you can stretch the bounds of typical “breakfast” toasts, too. Smoked salmon is a rich and luscious fish, and a little goes a long way: a pound will easily feed a family of four. Creamy yogurt, tangy capers, and crisp red onions balance the fattiness of the fish, but you can let people pick and choose the toppings they want with their smoked salmon toast. No one would say no to a bit of smashed avocado on this easy breakfast for dinner dish.
Tomato soup is full of disease-fighting nutrients, but contains as little as 74 calories per cup, no cholesterol, and less than 1 gram of saturated fat. Just keep in mind that there are many varieties. Cream of tomato is significantly higher in fat and calories. When buying canned soup, look for labels that say "low sodium" and check the calorie count. 
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